“WHOSE AFFIRMATIVE ACTION IS AFFIRMATIVE?” LESSONS FROM TANZANIA Cover Image

“WHOSE AFFIRMATIVE ACTION IS AFFIRMATIVE?” LESSONS FROM TANZANIA
“WHOSE AFFIRMATIVE ACTION IS AFFIRMATIVE?” LESSONS FROM TANZANIA

Author(s): Alexander Boniface Makulilo
Subject(s): Politics / Political Sciences
Published by: Central European University (CEU) - Department of Political Science

Summary/Abstract: Elections in Tanzania have resulted into the underrepresentation of women in the formal decision making organs particularly the parliament. To address this problem the government introduced women special seats as one of the ways to empower women to participate in making decisions that affect their concerns. The threshold level for such special seats was set at 15 percent in the 1995 elections, 20 percent in the 2000 elections and it was increased to 30 percent of all the parliamentary seats in the 2005 elections. This article argues that while there is a positive trend in terms of the numerical representation via an affirmative action system, the same is yet to be owned by women themselves. The affirmative action in Tanzania is strategically used to divide women and to further the interests of political parties, particularly the ruling party. Thus, women struggles for their inclusion in the formal decision making organs should simultaneously demand for the need to owning the affirmative action itself.

  • Issue Year: 2009
  • Issue No: 04
  • Page Range: 607-637
  • Page Count: 31
  • Language: English